Ask our pharmacist or your doctor about recommended vaccines based on your age and medical conditions. We can administer immunizations to adults and answer any questions you may have. Call us today and ask to speak to one of our immunization pharmacists!

Available Vaccines:

  • Flu (Influenza) Vaccine
    Influenza is a contagious respiratory illness caused by a virus. Symptoms of the flu usually come on suddenly and can include fever, cough, chills, sore throat, body aches, and tiredness.  Everyone, of all ages, should be vaccinated each year in the fall.
  • Pneumonia Vaccine
    Pneumococcal is caused by a bacterial infection. It can cause fever, chills, cough, difficulty breathing and chest pain. It is recommended for children under 5, all adults over age 65, and people with high risk factors such as smokers, heart disease, lung disease, diabetes, etc.
  • Shingles (Zoster) Vaccine Live
    Shingles is caused by a virus. Symptoms consist of a painful skin rash often with blisters. Anyone who has been exposed to chickenpox can develop shingles, but it is most common in people over the age of 50. The vaccination is recommended for age 60 or older.
  • Hepatitis A Vaccine
    Hepatitis A is a liver infection caused by a virus. It is spread when the virus is taken in by the mouth from contact with objects, food, or drinks contaminated by the stool of an infected person. It is important to know how you might be at increased risk for this disease. People traveling to countries where Hepatitis A is common should seek information about the vaccination.
  • Hepatitis B Vaccine
    Hepatitis B is a liver infection caused by a virus. It is spread when the blood or another body fluid from a person infected enters the body of someone who is not infected, and it can develop into a chronic disease from an acute infection. Symptoms appear on average 3 months after exposure, and include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, abdominal pain, dark urine, clay-colored bowel movements, joint pain, and jaundice (yellow color in the skin or eyes). It is recommended for all infants at birth and for anyone who has not previously received the vaccination, especially those in high risk groups.
  • Human Papillomavirus
    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection. Anyone who is sexually active can get HPV, even if you have had sex with only one person. It is so common that nearly all sexually active men and women will get at least one type of HPV at some point during their lives. Most people with HPV never develop symptoms, but some HPV infections will go on to cause certain cancers and other diseases. All girls and boys beginning at 11-12 years of age should get the recommended series of HPV vaccine.
  • Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Vaccine
    Measles, Mumps and Rubella are all serious viruses spread through the air. Symptoms of measles include rash, cough, runny nose, eye irritation, and fever. It can progress to ear infection, pneumonia, seizures, brain damage, and death. The Mumps virus causes fever, headache, muscle pain, loss of appetite, and swollen glands, all of which could progress to deafness, meningitis, and rarely sterility. Symptoms of Rubella include rash, arthritis, and fever. All children should receive the series of MMR vaccinations, as well as most adults who cannot show proof of previous immunization.
  • Meningococcal Vaccine
    Meningococcal infection is caused by bacteria. It is spread person to person through either saliva or respiratory secretions, such as through coughing. Symptoms include sudden onset of fever, headache, and stiff neck, as well as nausea, vomiting, increased sensitivity to light, and confusion. It is recommended children 11-12 years old receive the meningococcal vaccine with an additional booster at age 16.
  • Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussis Vaccine (DTaP and Tdap)
    Tetanus is a toxin found in the soil which often infects people through cuts, scratches, or puncture wounds in the skin. It can cause muscle spasms that ultimately lead to paralysis and death. Diptheria is a less common disease but still very dangerous. It is spread through coughing and sneezing, and can ultimately lead to paralysis and heart failure. Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, spreads very easily through coughing and sneezing. It can be very dangerous to babies and young children. It is important for babies to receive the vaccination series, and for everyone to receive booster doses throughout their life.
  • Varicella Vaccine
    Varicella-zoster, also known as chicken pox, is a virus that causes an itchy blister-like rash that will eventually spread over the entire body. The virus spreads easily through contact with or through breathing in respiratory droplets of a contaminated person. A person is contagious from 1-2 days before they get the rash until all of their blisters have formed scabs. Children through adults are all recommended to receive the vaccination series, which is about 90% effective at preventing chicken pox.

Other vaccines are available upon request.  For more detailed information on the above vaccines please visit:  www.cdc.gov/vaccines.

Helpful Vaccination Links

Adult vaccination schedule (CDC):
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/adult/adult-schedule-easy-read.pdf

How to check if your vaccination is covered by Medicare:
http://www.medicare.gov/coverage/shots.html

Immunizations and Pregnancy (CDC):
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/downloads/f_preg.pdf
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/downloads/f_preg_chart.pdf

Information about vaccinations if you have COPD or Asthma:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/patient-ed/adults/downloads/fs-asthma-vaccines.pdf

Information about vaccinations if you have Heart Disease:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/patient-ed/adults/downloads/fs-heart-disease-vaccines.pdf

Information about vaccinations if you have Diabetes:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/patient-ed/adults/downloads/fs-diabetes-vaccines.pdf